Adverse Reactions to Employer Mandated COVID-19 Vaccines Are OSHA Recordable Cases

April 26, 2021

If your company is requiring its employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19 it runs the risk of acquiring recordable illness cases. Recent revisions to OSHA’s frequently asked questions (FAQs) and answers related to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic indicates that OSHA considers employees’ negative reactions to the COVID-19 vaccines to be “work-related” and therefore, subject to recordkeeping and reporting mandates when an employer “requires” the vaccination. The question and answer from the updated FAQs follows.

If I require my employees to take the COVID-19 vaccine as a condition of their employment, are adverse reactions to the vaccine recordable? If you require your employees to be vaccinated as a condition of employment (i.e., for work-related reasons), then any adverse reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine is work-related. The adverse reaction is recordable if it is a new case under 29 CFR 1904.6 and meets one or more of the general recording criteria in 29 CFR 1904.7.

Updated FAQs

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I am rewatching Steve Whitmer's presentation from MEP Innovation Conference on Rising Tide of Model Changes for 3rd time today. Too many notes for one pass. Great ideas on progressive coordination, VE vs BIM Costs, and cost impacts during phases. https://www.mcaaevents.org/innovative-technologies-conference/live/

If insanity is doing the same thing and expecting different results, false hope is doing a different thing and expecting better results right away.

Expecting immediate improvement is a barrier to progress. Two steps forward often start with a step back.

http://go.ted.com/adamgrant

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